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Crimcast is a virtual resource devoted to critical conversations about criminology and criminal justice issues. Our blogposts, twitter feeds, podcasts and other content provide an overview of trends, research, commentary and events of interest to criminal justice practitioners, academics and the general public. CrimCast is sponsored by The Center for Crime and Popular Culture, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY.

Filtering by Tag: events

Graphic Justice Discussions 2019 | Drawing the Human: Law, Comics Justice

Nickie Phillips

Drawing the Human: Law, Comics Justice”

28-29 November 2019, USC, Queensland, Australia

The 2019 conference of the Graphic Justice Research Alliance will be hosted by the USC School of Law and Criminology, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland Australia. The conference explores the theme Drawing the Human: Law, Comics, Justice and will run on the 28th and 29th November 2019.

The conference seeks to examine the role of comics, graphic novels and graphic art in constituting as well as critiquing law, rights and justice as they relate to and extend beyond the human. Proposals for papers and panels are welcome from academics, postgraduate students and artists from across a range of disciplines including law, criminology and justice, comics studies, visual and cultural studies and the humanities.

Contact: Timothy Peters, USC Law School - tpeters@usc.edu.au

 

Graphic Justice Discussions NYC 2018

Nickie Phillips

We hosted the 2nd annual Graphic Justice Discussions Conference: Law, Comics, Justice on 20 October 2018 at St. Francis College, Brooklyn Heights, NYC. The conference was sponsored by the Graphic Justice Research Alliance and the Center for Crime & Popular Culture. The conference featured scholars and creators working at the intersection of law, comics, and justice.

We were thrilled to have legendary writer, editor, filmmaker, and journalist Ann Nocenti as our keynote speaker who held the crowd rapt with tales of her experiences in the industry.

We also welcomed Vita Ayala (The Wilds) and Kwanza Osajyefo (Black; Black: America’s Sweetheart; Black AF: Widows and Orphans) (Black Mask Studios) to speak about their work and experiences as creators.

You’re invited to take a look at the photos from the event. Hope to see everyone at the next Graphic Justice Discussions!

Call for Papers: Graphic Justice Discussions 2018, Keynote Ann Nocenti

Nickie Phillips

Graphic Justice Discussions - 20 October 2018 - St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY

Graphic Justice Discussions - 20 October 2018 - St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY

The Graphic Justice Research Alliance (GJRA) is delighted to announce a call for papers for its annual conference at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY to be held October 20, 2018. The theme for this year’s Graphic Justice Discussions is ‘Law, Comics, Justice’, and promises to be an exciting event that will be accessible and relevant to scholars, artists, practitioners, policy-makers, writers, and the general public alike.

We are gratified to announce that legendary comic writer and editor Ann Nocenti will join us as this event’s keynote speaker. Nocenti has lent her distinctive voice to numerous beloved comic book runs, including her writings for Marvel’s Daredevil and DC’s Catwoman, Katana, and Green Arrow. We very much look forward to hearing her observations about the industry, as well as reflections on her latest project, the forthcoming The Seeds, a new four-issue series in collaboration with artist David Aja. The series, part of a new line of Berger Books published by Dark Horse Comics, is described as “An eco-fiction tech-thriller … a story of love beyond race and gender, and of the resilience of both human and animal kind.”

Please join us for what promises to be a stimulating and inclusive occasion! Send 250-word abstracts to Nickie Phillips at nphillips@sfc.edu.

Stay tuned for more details to follow...

The GJRA is a multidisciplinary research network exploring the crossover between law and justice and comics of all kinds.

Urban Justice Center: 2016 Celebration & Recognition Awards

Nickie Phillips

Join reentry advocate Johnny Perez and others to honor Roy Waterman and Julia Steele at the 2016 Celebration & Recognition Awards.The celebration will take place over Hors D'oeuvres, an open wine bar, comedy by funny man Kenny Woo, and my favorite: Spoken Word. Opening remarks will be made by Juju Chang, Emmy Award-winning co-anchor of ABC News’ “Nightline,” Since the event willbe held on a private rooftop residence in midtown, event location will be shared upon registration.

The Urban Justice Center(UJC) Mental Health Project (MHP) has provided re-entry services for people with mental health concerns who are leaving New York State prisons or New York City jails and returning to the NYC community. Safe Re-entry advocate, Johnny Perez, has been the driving force behind MHP’s re-entry work, and this work has demonstrated to the UJC that many people returning to NYC from institutions of incarceration could benefit from assistance in re-entry.

The proceeds from this fundraiser will be used to research and develop a new project at the UJC: ReAP – the Re-entry Advocacy Project. With Johnny Perez’s direction, this project will provide support for people exiting our institutions of incarceration to obtain benefits and supports necessary to become integrated fully into the NYC community. The UJC hopes to begin ReAP in the fall of 2017.

Julia Steele Allen
Co-Writer, Producer, Performer
Mariposa & the Saint: From Solitary Confinement, A Play Through Letters

* Mariposa & the Saint is a play written entirely through letters between Julia Steele Allen and Sara (Mariposa) Fonseca over the course of three years, while Mariposa was held in isolation at a California women's prison. Partnering with grassroots organizations, Julia has performed the play over 50 times across 9 states, for legislators, judges, wardens corrections officials, faith communities, theater audiences, and students, using the play as an organizing tool to support the growing movement that will end solitary confinement in this country.

Roy Waterman
Director of Engagement for Drive Change and Owner and Head Chef of Caribbean Soul Caterers

* Drive Change is a non profit Social Enterprise that uses the mobile vending industry to train, employ, mentor, and encourage formerly incarcerated young people ages 18-25 years old who are released from adult jails and prison. Drive Change pays them a livable wage as well as a percentage of the food truck sales. Drive Change also provides licensed credentials such as the food handlers license and mobile vending license. The agency's focus is on the social and emotional leaning and on job training.

 

You can register for the Celebration here.

 

I really hope you are able to attend, or at the very least are able to purchase a ticket for someone who is formerly incarcerated, because freedom really is something to be celebrated in this era of Mass Incarceration. Please feel free to share the attached Celebration flier with your networks.  

Notable Criminal Justice Docs at Tribeca Film Festival

Nickie Phillips

When the most powerful lobbyist in Florida discovers that the nanny has sexually abused his daughter, he harnesses his extraordinary political power to pass the toughest sex offender laws in the nation. UNTOUCHABLE chronicles his crusade, and its impact on the lives of several of the 800,000 people forced to live under the kinds of laws he has championed.
— Untouchablefilm.com
 
In 2012, California amended its ‘Three Strikes’ law—one of the harshest criminal sentencing policies in the country. The passage of Prop. 36 marked the first time in U.S. history that citizens voted to shorten sentences of those currently incarcerated. Within days, the reintegration of thousands of ‘lifers’ was underway. The Return examines this unprecedented reform through the eyes of those on the front lines—prisoners suddenly freed, families turned upside down, reentry providers helping navigate complex transitions, and attorneys and judges wrestling with an untested law.
— The Return Project
Do Not Resist is an urgent and powerful exploration of the rapid militarization of the police in the United States. Opening on startling on-the-scene footage in Ferguson, Missouri, the film then broadens its scope to present scenes from across the country—a conference presentation where the value of high-end weapons technologies is presented to potential police buyers, a community that has just received its very own military-grade tank, and a SWAT team arriving at a home to execute a warrant. The cumulative effect of these vignettes paints a startling picture of the direction our local law enforcement is headed.
— Do Not Resist, Deborah Rudolph
Solitary investigates an invisible part of the American justice system: the use of isolation and segregation in US prisons, commonly known as solitary confinement.
— Tribeca Film Institute

Exclusive clip of Solitary at Deadline.

The Confined Arts: Solitary Confinement Edition at SFC

Nickie Phillips

Solitary confinement is torture...and should completely be abolished.
— Confined Arts: Solitary Confinement Edition
The Confined Arts: Solitary Confinement Edition - SFC March 12, 2016

The Confined Arts: Solitary Confinement Edition - SFC March 12, 2016

The Confined Arts: Solitary Confinement Edition - SFC March 12, 2016

Humanizing The Dehumanized: The Legacy Of Eugenics And The Relevance Today at Central Booking

Nickie Phillips

Twisted Data

Join us for the panel Humanizing The Dehumanized: The Legacy Of Eugenics And The Relevance Today

January 21 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

OffLINE at CENTRAL BOOKING, 

21 Ludlow St, New York, 10002 United States

Moderator: Nickie Phillips, criminologist, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NYC

Panelists: Artists Noah Fuller, Geraldine Ondrizek, and Barbara Rosenthal featured in Twisted Data exhibit

This panel will explore the legacy of eugenics and the ways that “scientific” data has been used to justify atrocities. The panelists will discuss how the categorization of individuals, dehumanization, and bureaucratization converged to reinforce cultural prejudices and the lasting impact of these policies and practices. The study and reception of bio-criminological explanations of criminality will be discussed in light of the history of eugenics within the field of criminology, as well as other unfortunate implications of the movement to “purify” the population.

In My Neighborhood: First-Hand Stories of Police Interactions

Nickie Phillips

UPDATE: Marlon Peterson was a guest speaker for our "In My Neighborhood…" panel. Here is his account of what happened after: ‘Driving While Black:’ Anatomy of a Police Stop

Last month, I spoke at a panel on Urban Policing at St. Francis College in New York about the historical underpinnings of the animus of Back and Brown people toward police. I drew the linear connection between the Harlem Riots of 1943; Watts 1965; Los Angeles, 1992; Ferguson 2014; and Baltimore 2015.

I mentioned that although I work to reduce community gun violence and police violence—and often consult with elected officials about how to engage the community in various endeavors—I am still aware that my Black body is under threat from violent policing.

Two days later, my words came back to haunt me.…
— Marlon Peterson

This lecture is part of our Fall 2015 Senior Citizen Lecture Series focused on Urban Policing and Racial Conflict: Current Crises and Historical Contexts

Emily Horowitz & Nickie Phillips, Coordinators

Johnny Perez (Urban Justice Center and SFC '17) served as moderator for a discussion with panelists Damien Stapleton (Harlem-based community activist) & Marlon Peterson (2015 Soros Justice Fellow + activist against gun violence) & Pastor Terence Brunson (Clergy, Police, & Community in Unity Movement). Johnny, a St. Francis student, is a mental health advocate at The Urban Justice Center, a member of the Jails Action Coalition, the Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated Confinement (CAIC), the New York Reentry Education Network, and the Bar Association’s Correction and Reentry Committee.  Drawing on his 13 years of direct involvement with the criminal justice system, Johnny has testified at the NY Advisory Committee to the US Civil Rights; spoken at Cornell Law, Fordham,  Amnesty International, Princeton, the United Nations, and The American Justice Summit; appeared on Al-Jazeera, in a documentary about solitary confinement and NY1;  and received the Victor Hassine Memorial Essay Award for his essay on the transformative power of education.

New York Gets Psyched for the People's Climate March

Nickie Phillips

image.jpg

 

New Yorkers are in for an exciting moment in history, poised to make a major contribution to the generations that come after us.  The People’s Climate March is gearing up to be a massive march in support of sustainability and environmental justice.  It will be a clear message to the United Nations that the world’s people–represented in the cosmopolitan city of New York–are forming a bona fide social movement.  People want to live on a safe, clean planet.  They want to face up to the debt of industrialization and make the hard decision to stop, and hopefully reverse, the adverse effects of climate change.

Last month, Robert Jay Lifton wrote in the New York Times that what we are experiencing is part of an American “climate swerve.”  Lifton, a psychohistorian best known for his work on trauma in the aftermath of the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan, has likened the new consciousness in America about climate change to the social movement around nuclear disarmament in the 1980s.  It is a swerve toward a popular engagement with the ethical, economic, and political considerations of the man-made phenomenon of global warming and all its devastations, past, present, and future.  It is a swerve that hopes to call out climate change deniers and put pressure on politicians to think urgently and creatively about solutions.

Lifton explains that the swerve is a product of the “drumbeat” of natural disasters on TV.   He writes:

Responding to the climate threat — in contrast to the nuclear threat, whose immediate and grotesque destructiveness was recorded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki — has been inhibited by the difficulty of imagining catastrophic future events. But climate-related disasters and intense media images are hitting us now, and providing partial models for a devastating climate future.

The problem, in essence, has become easily imaginable (New Yorkers: think Hurricane Sandy).  Couple this with new economic thinking that has begun to devalue fossil fuels as resources because of the externalities involved in using them– the cost of destroying our habitat– and the ethical arguments begin to emerge.  Is the use of carbon-based sources of energy too high a price to pay in the long run because we are destroying our very home? Environmentalists have long answered this question with a resounding “yes,” but a growing segment of the general public now feels this way, too.

The People’s Climate March, many are saying, will be the defining event of the climate swerve.  Luckily, there is a place in history for everyone who can be in New York City on September 21 to join the throngs who will demand change.  And there is a place in history for all those unable to be there, but who continue to pressure their politicians for pro-environment policies, who recycle religiously, support environmental groups, and who think creatively about local solutions to the macro problem of climate change.  This is a big moment, and together we can make a difference.

This post originally appeared on the Sustainability & Environmental Justice blog.

Crime in Film/Media/Popular Culture Tweet Chat

Nickie Phillips

Join Intellect academic publishers on Thursday 7th August at 4.30pm BST/11:30am EST for a Tweet chat on the topic of Crime in Film/Media/Popular Culture.

You can chat @IntellectBooks and hashtag #IntellectChat

Some academics currently scheduled for the tweet chat are:

Louis Bayman completed his doctoral thesis on post-war Italian melodrama at King’s College, London, and is currently researching theoretical approaches to the social and aesthetic characteristics of popular cinema.

A contributor to Film International since 2005, Carl Freedman is the James F. Cassidy Professor of English at Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge). He is the author of many books and articles, including, most recently, The Age of Nixon: A Study in Cultural Power (Zero Books, 2012).

Chris Richardson is a doctoral student in Media Studies at The University of Western Ontario. He received a Bachelor of Journalism from Ryerson University in 2007 and a Master of Arts in Popular Culture from Brock University in 2008. His work primarily focuses on intersections of popular culture, journalism and the construction of space/place. He has written on Bloc Party, Bret Easton Ellis and Kanye West, and is currently co-editing a collection on habitus and representations of ‘the hood’ with Hans A. Skott-Myhre of Brock University.

Live Stream - The Internet and Free Speech: A Preview of The Internet’s Own Boy Event

Nickie Phillips

The Paley Center will host The Internet and Free Speech: A Preview of the Internet's Own Boy.   The Live Stream will be held at 8:20 pm ET/5:20 pm PT.

For information and tickets to the live event in NYC, go here.

The Internet and Free Speech: A Preview of The Internet’s Own Boy

Tuesday, June 17, 2014 6:30 pm New York

...Variety has stated that the film “may be the most emotionally devastating movie ever made about hacking and the freedom of information....

The event will include:

Brian Knappenberger, Director Christopher Soghoian, Principal Technologist, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, ACLU Jane Hamsher, Publisher, FireDogLake.com Moderator: Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law and Director, Program on Law & Technology, Columbia Law School

Go here for more information.

Lineage Project: Yoga and Meditation for At-Risk Youth

Nickie Phillips

The Lineage Project, in partnership with Laughing Lotus Yoga Center,  is hosting a raffle to increase their yoga and meditation classes for at-risk, court-involved and incarcerated youth.

Go here for more information.

The Lineage Project:

Through yoga, meditation, discussion and other mindfulness techniques, we help young people to value themselves and feel that they can make a lasting and important contribution to their communities.

We work in juvenile detention centers, alternative-to-incarceration programs and public schools for struggling students.

Tickets are only $10 each or 12 for $100. They can be purchased online or at the Front Desk at Laughing Lotus Yoga Center.

Please note: YogaTeesNYC is donating 10% of all sales to Lineage Project until the end of the raffle on June 22.