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Events

Sep
25
11:10 AM11:10

Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 25 - Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock Amy Werbel (Art History, Fashion Institute of Technology)

Amy Werbel is an associate professor of Art History at the Fashion Institute of Technology, & author numerous works on the subject of American visual culture and sexuality, including Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of American Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock (Columbia University Press, 2018), which was praised in Kirkus Reviews as "an incisive history of the futility of censorship;" and Thomas Eakins: Art, Medicine, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia (Yale University Press, 2007), which was praised in The New England Journal of Medicine as "a rigorous academic review that is readable and enjoyable." In 2011-2012 she was a Fulbright scholar in China, where she taught & lectured on topics including censorship.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
9
11:10 AM11:10

Family Separation: A First Hand Guide to Chaos on the Border

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 9 - Family Separation: A First Hand Guide to Chaos on the Border Debbie Nathan (Author/Journalist)

Debbie Nathan is a Texas-based journalist & one of the first journalists to report on the recent family separation policies. A journalist, editor and translator for over 3 decades, specializing in immigration and sexual politics and sex panics, and author of 4 books, including Sybil, Inc., Debbie's work has won numerous national and regional awards, including: The H.L. Mencken Award for Investigative Journalism, the PEN West Award for Journalism, the Texas Institute of Letters Award for feature journalism, the Hugh Hefner First Amendment Award for Journalism, and the John Bartlow Martin Award from Northwestern for Public Service Journalism. 

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
16
11:10 AM11:10

Becoming an Activist: Dr. Frank Greene Honors Program Lecture

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 16 - **Founder’s Hall ** Becoming an Activist - Dr. Frank Greene Honors Program Lecture

Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs (St. Francis graduate/fashion designer/Co-coordinator of Women’s March)

Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs is a St. Francis graduate, and served as Youth Initiative Coordinator of the Women's March. A fashion activist who runs the zero waste clothing label, Tabii Just, she’s also an advocate for fair and ethical labor for garment workers, and educates people about the global effects of fast fashion on small manufacturing communities. She advocates for zero waste in the fashion industry and for methods of reducing waste for a fashion brand from the first step of sourcing fabric or designing to empowering the customer with knowledge to re-usable packing materials. She has shown collections during New York Fashion Week and dressed prominent women for the red carpet. Her work has been exhibited at Princeton University and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Museum, and also writes about raising a biracial child in America with her husband on her blog and in several publications.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
20
8:30 AM08:30

Graphic Justice Discussions 2018 featuring Ann Nocenti

The Graphic Justice Research Alliance (GJRA) is delighted to announce a call for papers for its annual conference at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY to be held October 20, 2018. The theme for this year’s Graphic Justice Discussions is ‘Law, Comics, Justice’, and promises to be an exciting event that will be accessible and relevant to scholars, artists, practitioners, policy-makers, writers, and the general public alike.

We are gratified to announce that legendary comic writer and editor Ann Nocenti will join us as this event’s keynote speaker. Nocenti has lent her distinctive voice to numerous beloved comic book runs, including her writings for Marvel’s Daredevil and DC’s Catwoman, Katana, and Green Arrow. We very much look forward to hearing her observations about the industry, as well as reflections on her latest project, the forthcoming The Seeds, a new four-issue series in collaboration with artist David Aja. The series, part of a new line of Berger Books published by Dark Horse Comics, is described as “An eco-fiction tech-thriller … a story of love beyond race and gender, and of the resilience of both human and animal kind.”

Please join us for what promises to be a stimulating and inclusive occasion!

The GJRA is a multidisciplinary research network exploring the crossover between law and justice and comics of all kinds.

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Oct
23
11:10 AM11:10

J. Edgar Hoover: Sex, Lies & Political History

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 23 - J. Edgar Hoover: Sex, Lies & Political History Claire Potter (History, The New School)

Claire Potter is a professor of History at The New School, Executive Editor of Public Seminar, and Director of the Digital Humanities Initiative. She researches post-1970 U.S. history, political history, the histories of gender and sexuality, and mass culture. She is author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-men, and the Politics of Mass Culture (1998); Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (2012); & Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (2012). She is the author of the column "Tenured Radical" (now her Twitter handle) at The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as articles for Dissent, The Village Voice, Inside Higher Education, and Jacobin.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
30
11:10 AM11:10

They Said No to Nixon: The Heroes in the Nixon Administration Who Took Him Down

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 30 - They Said No to Nixon: The Heroes in the Nixon Administration Who Took Him Down Michael Koncewicz (Tamiment Library, NYU)
Michael Koncewicz has taught History at St. Francis and directs the Cold War archival collections at NYU’s Tamiment Library. He received his Ph.D. in History at UC Irvine (2014) and is the author of They Said No to Nixon: Republicans Who Stood Up to the President's Abuses of Power (University of California Press, 2018).

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
6
11:10 AM11:10

Transitions in the Women's Movement: From Sexual Liberation to Carceral Feminism

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 6 - Transitions in the Women's Movement: From Sexual Liberation to Carceral Feminism Judith Levine (Author/Journalist)
 

Judith Levine is the author of 4 books and countless articles exploring politics, policy, and the intersection of sex and justice. Levine is best known for Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children From Sex, winner of 2002 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and named by SIECUS, the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, as one of history's most influential books about sexuality. She is also the author of Not Buying It: My Year Without Shopping (2015), a journal examining consumerism and anti-consumerist movements. Not Buying It has been translated into five languages.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
13
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: Riker's An American Jail & Q & A with St. Francis Post-Prison Students

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 13 - Film Screening: Riker's An American Jail & Q & A with St. Francis Post-Prison Students (Moderated by Johnny Perez, St. Francis ‘2018, and Director of U.S. Prisons Program, National Campaign Against Torture)
 

RIKERS: AN AMERICAN JAIL, is an award-winning documentary from Bill Moyers that brings you face to face with those who have endured incarceration at Rikers Island. The U.S. is facing a crisis of mass incarceration with over 2.2 million people packed into its prisons. Almost 80% of the 7500 people detained at Riker’s have not yet been found guilty or innocent of the charges they face. All are at risk in the pervasive culture of violence that forces people to come to terms with what they must do for their own survival. Their stories in Rikers vividly describe the cruel arc of the Rikers experience-from the shock of entry, to the extortion and control exercised by other inmates, the oppressive interaction with corrections officers, the beatings and stabbings, the torture of solitary confinement and the many challenges of returning to the outside world.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
20
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: What Happened Miss Simone?

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 20 - Film Screening: What Happened Miss Simone? Followed by Q&A with Prof. Sara Rzeszutek (History, St. Francis College)
Directed by Liz Garbus, this film chronicles the life of American singer Nina Simone, who became a civil rights activist and moved to Liberia following the turbulence of the 1960s. The documentary combines previously unreleased archival footage and interviews with Simone's daughter and friends. The screening will be followed by a Q & A with Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, author of James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement (University of Kentucky Press, 2015). 

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
27
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: Strong Island

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 27 - Film Screening: Strong Island (Directed by Yance Ford, 2017)

Excerpt about STRONG ISLAND (2017 Academy Award nominee) from The New Yorker: "In Yance Ford's powerful, disturbing, and very personal documentary, details are important. What happened in 1992 was the murder of Yance's own brother, William Ford, Jr., who grew up in the black enclave of Central Islip. He was shot in the chest with a rifle by Mark Reilly, a young white man. The shop's owner had a record of running a shady business. William Ford had no record and was about to take the entrance exam to be a corrections officer. Ford's mother, Barbara Dunmore Ford, an educator who founded Rosewood, a school for women on Rikers Island, says in ‘Strong Island’ that she will believe until her dying day that the grand jury of twenty-three white people did not return a true bill because her son was a black man. As the documentary makes plain, the grand jury didn't care to find out what really happened."

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
29
12:20 PM12:20

Q&A with Yance Ford, Director of Strong Island

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 29 - **Thursday @ 12:20** - Q&A with Yance Ford, Director of Strong Island

Yance Ford is the director of Strong Island, winner of the Special Jury Award for Storytelling at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and Academy Award nominee. Ford is a member of the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program, a MacDowell Colony fellow, a Creative Capital Grantee (Theo Westenberger Award) and has been featured in Filmmaker Magazine's 25 New Faces of Independent Film. He is a former Series Producer of POV, a graduate of Hamilton College and the Production Workshop at Third World Newsreel. The Guardian called Strong Island one of the finest documentaries of 2017.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Sep
18
11:10 AM11:10

The FBI's War on Black Bookstores

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 18 - The FBI's War on Black Bookstores Joshua Clark Davis (History, University of Baltimore) on The FBI's War on Black Bookstores
Joshua Clark Davis is an assistant professor of History at the University of Baltimore. His book, From Head Shops to Whole Foods: The Rise and Fall of Activist Entrepreneurs (Columbia University Press, 2017) examines how natural foods stores, head shops, feminist businesses, and African American booksellers emerged from social movements in the 1960s to advance the goals of political transformation and cultural liberation.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Sep
11
11:10 AM11:10

Forgiveness and Redemption in an Age of Mass Incarceration 

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 11 - Forgiveness and Redemption in an Age of Mass Incarceration 
A Conversation w/David Garlock & Stephen Chu

David Garlock was a client of Bryan Stevenson while serving 13 years in prison - he was sentenced at 20. After his release, Stevenson helped Garlock enter his alma mater, Eastern University, where Garlock earned his college degree. Garlock will talk about mercy, forgiveness, and the criminal justice system with Stephen Chu, who served as a Staff Attorney at the Equal Justice Initiative from 2009 - 2017; Chu is currently a Supervising Attorney at the NYC Office of the Appellate Defender.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Apr
3
1:20 PM13:20

Debbie Nathan on Immigrants as Crime Victims

Debbie Nathan is a renowned journalist who currently specializes in writing about immigration issues especially along the U.S.-Mexico border.

On Tuesday, April 3, she'll be sharing her knowledge on immigrants as victims of crime at SFC - in particular the resources available to them and the factors behind their hesitancy to report victimization. 

When: Tuesday, April 3rd from 1:20-2:45

Where: Room 6306.

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Feb
13
11:10 AM11:10

Deborah Gray White, Women Slaves in the Antebellum South

The Senior Citizen Lecture Series Welcomes: Deborah Gray White, Women Slaves in the Antebellum South

Author of the groundbreaking Ar’n’t I A Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South, Deborah Gray White is the Board of Governors Professor of History and Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. Her other works include: Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower; Let My People Go: African Americans 1800-1865; and Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves.

Series Director: Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, History Department, St. Francis College

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Feb
6
11:10 AM11:10

Historian and Pulitzer Prize Winner Steven Hahn, Pre-Civil War Politics

The Senior Citizen Lecture Series welcomes Historian and Pulitzer Prize Winner Steven Hahn, Pre-Civil War Politics

Steven Hahn, winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in History, is Professor of History at New York University. He is author of A Nation Without Borders:The United States and its World in an Age of Civil Wars, 1830-1910; The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom; and A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration.

Series Director: Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, History Department, St. Francis College

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Jan
25
9:35 AM09:35

Murray Lee on Fear of Crime

 Prof. Murray Lee

Prof. Murray Lee

Prof. Murray Lee, University of Sydney Law School, will join us to speak about fear of crime.

"Murray Lee is a Professor in Criminology at the University of Sydney Law School. He has been a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and the University of Liverpool. He is the author of Inventing Fear of Crime: Criminology and the Politics of Anxiety, co-author of Policing and Media: Public Relations, Simulations and Communications, co-editor of Fear of Crime: Critical Voices in an Age of Anxiety, and editor of the scholarly journal Current Issues in Criminal Justice. Murray’s research focuses broadly on representations and perceptions of crime and how these lead to processes of criminalisation. This includes the increasing mediatization of crime and crime control and the development of new forms of media and communication that both create new crime risks and new anxieties, but also new forms of surveillance, control and governance." 

Dr. Murray most recently co-edited the 2018 The Routledge International Handbook on Fear of Crime published in 2018 by Routledge.

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Dec
5
11:10 AM11:10

Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Dec. 5: Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

Dr. Kathleen Gray is a sociologist and the Assistant Academic Dean at St. Francis College. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh with a research focus on race and racism. Her work explores how white people collectively construct, reinforce, and occasionally disrupt dominant racial ideology during conversations about race and politics. She also works on critical pedagogy and is the creator of a segregation simulation called The Neighborhood Game, which is used in sociology courses throughout the country to teach students about structural inequality.

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Nov
28
11:10 AM11:10

Dr. Mical Raz - Making Child Abuse White? Parents Anonymous, Physicians and Child Abuse Policy in the 1970s 

Nov. 28: Dr. Mical Raz - Making Child Abuse White? Parents Anonymous, Physicians and Child Abuse Policy in the 1970s 

Mical Raz, MD, PhD, completed her medical training at Tel Aviv University, where she also received a Ph.D. in History of Medicine. She’s worked at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and volunteered with Physicians for Human Rights. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. She is the author Psychosurgery (U of Rochester 2013) and What's Wrong with the Poor? Race, Psychiatry and the War on Poverty (UNC 2013). A historian of American psychiatry, Raz is interested in the intersection of psychiatry, poverty and politics. Broadly, her new work focuses on how perceptions of mental health shaped child welfare services provided in the city of Philadelphia in the 1960s and early 1970s; she is interested in the history of child abuse laws in the mid-1960s, and their implication for treatment and prevention. She examines how child abuse came to be perceived as an individual problem rooted in the abuser’s psychopathology, rather than a broader social problem. She hopes to use her historical research to help inform current child welfare policy.

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Nov
21
11:10 AM11:10

Margee Kerr - Hijacking Fear: The subtle, and not so subtle ways politicians and the media use fear to motivate action

 SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Nov. 21: Margee Kerr - Hijacking Fear: The subtle, and not so subtle ways politicians and the media use fear to motivate action

Margee Kerr is a sociologist and author. She earned her Ph.D. in 2009 from the University of Pittsburgh and currently teaches and conducts research on fear, specifically how and why people engage with "scary" material. Dr. Kerr is the co-investigator on a first-of-its-kind study which measures how the brain and body respond to "fun-scary" experiences like haunted attractions, paranormal investigations, and thrill rides. She enjoys working as a consultant for attractions and museums and is the author of SCREAM: Chilling Adventures in the Science of fear, named a must read by The Washington Post. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Parade, Atlantic Monthly, and NPR’s Science Friday, among other places. 

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Nov
14
11:10 AM11:10

Belen Lowrey-Kinberg - The Application of Forensic Linguistics to Policing: The Case of Sandra Bland

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Nov. 14: Belen Lowrey-Kinberg - The Application of Forensic Linguistics to Policing: The Case of Sandra Bland

Professor Belen Lowrey-Kinberg (Assistant Professor, Sociology & Criminal Justice, St. Francis) gives an overview of forensic linguistics, examines the escalation of language in Sandra Bland’s traffic stop, and discuss how theories from criminal justice and linguistics can help us understand police-citizen dynamics. Lowrey-Kinberg will explores questions with implications for police-citizen interactions, such as: How did a routine traffic stop become such a violent encounter? What interactional factors could explain such rapidly escalating tensions between an officer and a civilian? Analysis based in the field of forensic linguistics provides some clues.

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Nov
7
11:10 AM11:10

Judith Levine and Professor Trevor Hoppe - The War on Sex

Nov. 7: Judith Levine and Professor Trevor Hoppe - The War on Sex

Judith Levine (noted journalist and author) and co-editor Trevor Hoppe (Assistant Professor, Sociology, SUNY Albany) discuss their important new work -- The War on Sex (Duke University Press).

“The past fifty years are conventionally understood to have witnessed an uninterrupted expansion of sexual rights and liberties in the United States. This state-of-the-art collection tells a different story: while progress has been made in marriage equality, reproductive rights, access to birth control, and other areas, government and civil society are waging a war on stigmatized sex by means of law, surveillance, and social control. The contributors document the history and operation of sex offender registries and the criminalization of HIV, as well as highly punitive measures against sex work that do more to harm women than to combat human trafficking. They reveal that sex crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes, while new legal and administrative regulations drastically restrict who is permitted to have sex. By examining how the ever-intensifying war on sex affects both privileged and marginalized communities, the essays collected here show why sexual liberation is indispensable to social justice and human rights.”

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Oct
31
11:10 AM11:10

Arun Venugopal - Post-Trump Politics

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Oct. 31: Arun Venugopal - Post-Trump Politics

Arun Venugopal is a reporter and the host of Micropolis, WNYC's ongoing examination of race, sexuality and identity. The series has explored such issues as the global skin-lightening market, the problems with ethnic sitcoms and the meaning of turbans. Arun is a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He has appeared on PBS Newshour, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, On the Media, and Studio 360, and has been published in The GuardianThe Wall Street Journal and Salon. His commentary on Indian-American issues has appeared in the New York Times, the New York Post and the Associated Press. He also frequently serves as an emcee and moderator of panel discussions on race, religion and identity issues.

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Oct
30
6:00 PM18:00

Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work - Book Discussion

The Center for Crime & Popular Culture @ St. Francis College presents a panel discussion about an important new book: Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work (Temple University Press, 2017).

All are invited to attend this panel discussion about sex work, a realm where sexual civil liberties are embattled.  Corey Shdaimah and Chrysanthi Leon will be our in-person guests; Katie Hail-Jares will join us by Skype from Australia.  Co-editors of, Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work, the trio will enlighten us about sex work in the 21st century as well as the larger war on sex. Copies will be available for purchase; refreshments to follow!

Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work brings the voices of lower-echelon sex workers and individuals charged with policy development and enforcement into conversation with one another. Chapters highlight some of the current approaches to sex work, such as diversion courts, trafficking task forces, law enforcement assisted diversion and decriminalization. It also examines how sex workers navigate seldom-discussed social phenomena like gentrification, pregnancy, imperialism, and being subjects of research. Through dialogue, our authors reveal the complex reality of engaging in and regulating sex work in the United States and through American aid abroad.

Katie Hail-Jares is a post-doctoral researcher at Griffith Criminology Institute in South East Queensland, and national board member of the Sex Workers' Outreach Project. Her research has appeared in PLOS-ONEJournal of Drug and Alcohol Dependency, Iowa Law Review, and other journals.

Corey S. Shdaimah is Associate Professor and Academic Coordinator of the dual degree MSW/JD program at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She is the author or co-author of several books, including Change Research: A Case Study of Collaborative Methods for Social Workers and Advocates.

Chrysanthi S. Leon is Associate Professor of Sociology & Criminal Justice, Women & Gender Studies, and Legal Studies at the University of Delaware. She is the author of Sex Fiends, Perverts, and Pedophiles: Understanding Sex Crime Policy in America.

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Oct
17
11:10 AM11:10

Marty Tankleff - Being Wrongfully Convicted & Exonerated

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

October 17: Marty Tankleff - Being Wrongfully Convicted & Exonerated

Marty Tankleff was wrongly convicted of murdering his wealthy parents when he was 17 years old after being pressured into a false confession. He served 17 years before his conviction was vacated. Tankleff received a settlement from the state after he settled his wrongful conviction lawsuit; he recently graduated from law school and passed the bar exam; Marty now plans to help the wrongfully convicted. He will be joined by his lawyer Amy Marion (Partner at Barket & Marion).

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Oct
3
11:10 AM11:10

Debbie Nathan - Politics on the U.S.-Mexican Border

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Oct. 3: Debbie Nathan - Politics on the U.S.-Mexican Border 

Debbie Nathan has been a journalist, editor and translator for almost three decades. She specializes in writing about immigration, the U.S.-Mexico border, sexual politics and sex panics, particularly in relation to women and children. Debbie is author and co-author of four books, including Sybil, Inc (2012); she currently works for the ACLU as an investigator at the U.S.-Mexican border and recently published the piece, DPS Troopers Push Undocumented Immigrants Into a Deportation Pipeline.

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Sep
26
11:10 AM11:10

Catherine Carpenter - The Unconstitutionality of Sex Offense Laws

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 26: Catherine Carpenter - The Unconstitutionality of Sex Offense Laws

Professor Catherine Carpenter (Southwestern Law School) is a nationally renowned criminal law scholar in the area of sex crimes and sex offender registration laws. Her scholarship has been cited by numerous courts and used as a guide by attorneys; she is also one of the foremost authorities on law school curricula and accreditation. Among her important law review articles is, “Against Juvenile Sex Offender Registration.”

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Sep
19
11:10 AM11:10

Adam H. Johnson - Media Bias and Inaccuracy

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 19: Adam H. Johnson - Media Bias and Inaccuracy

Adam H. Johnson writes for Fair Media Watch, the Nation, Alternet, and the Los Angeles Times (“How the media smears black victims”). He co-hosts Citations Needed, a weekly podcast about the intersection of media, PR, and power, with Nima Shirazi.

@AdamJohnsonNYC

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Sep
12
11:10 AM11:10

Chase Madar - The Criminalization of Everyday Life  

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 12: Chase Madar -The Criminalization of Everyday Life  

Chase Madar is a civil rights attorney in New York and the author of The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story behind the Wikileaks Whistleblower (Verso). Madar will talk about how we're using criminal law, police, and prisons to deal with nearly ALL of our problems, and why this is counterproductive.

@ChMadar

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Apr
25
11:10 AM11:10

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

-- Prof. Phillips will talk about her new book that traces ways that sexual violence is collectively processed, mediated, negotiated, and contested by exploring public reactions to high-profile incidents and rape narratives in popular culture.

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Apr
18
11:10 AM11:10

Shannen Dee Williams on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return engagement! Guest Speaker: Shannen Dee Williams (History, University of Tennessee) on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

-- Dr. Williams is currently working on her book, “Subversive Habits: Black Nuns and the Long Struggle to Desegregate Catholic America.” She will return to SFC this spring to talk more about her groundbreaking study chronicling the epic journey of black Catholic sisters from their fiercely contested beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present day and the largely hidden history of the fight to dismantle racial and gender barriers in the U.S. Church and wider American society.

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Apr
11
11:10 AM11:10

Kay Hymowitz on Brooklyn Today

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Kay Hymowitz on her new book: Brooklyn Today -- Just decades ago, the Brooklyn stereotype was typified by television programs such as “The Honeymooners” and “Welcome Back, Kotter”—comedies about working-class sensibilities, deprivation, and struggles. Today, the borough across the East River from Manhattan is home to trendsetters, celebrities, and enough “1 percenters” to draw the Occupy Wall Street protests across the Brooklyn Bridge. “Tres Brooklyn,” has become a compliment among gourmands in Parisian restaurants. Hymowitz chronicles the policies and events that transformed the borough so dramatically and considers whether the borough’s new wealth will lift up some of the borough’s most blighted neighborhoods

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Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration
Apr
11
9:00 AM09:00

Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration

This forum will bring together a range of leaders in the criminal justice field to talk about strategies that can reduce both violence and mass incarceration.  The day’s dynamic conversations and interviews will be organized around four key principles outlined in a recent Common Justice report—exploring responses to violence that are centered on survivors, based in accountability, driven by safety, and racially equitable.  

 

This event is sponsored by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations

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Apr
4
11:10 AM11:10

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction -- With help from SFC criminal justice professor Don Savatta, Carl Dukes was freed from prison in July 2016. Dukes spent almost 20 years in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murdering a 23-year-old student at the University of Albany in 1997. Dukes will return to SFC to talk about his struggle to re-enter society and build his life today. Dukes was exonerated after another man confessed to killing the student.

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Mar
28
11:10 AM11:10

Katherine Parkin on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Katherine Parkin (History, Monmouth University) on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

This talk considers the 100+ year debate in American society about whether or not women or men are better drivers. Parkin argues that we never use the term man driver and found that people only asked the question to assert male superiority, even when the evidence discovered women as comparably good or better drivers. This talk speaks to a notion of identity and argues that we face an entrenched sexism that most people aren't aware of, including their own prejudiced views – and brings the debate up into the modern day, with dismissal of women as drivers persisting.

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Mar
21
11:10 AM11:10

Lloyd Handwerker on the history of Nathan's Hot Dogs

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Guest Speaker and Film Screening: Lloyd Handwerker, author/film-maker on the history of Nathan’s Hot Dogs (and a grandson of Nathan’s founder Nathan Handwerker).

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Mar
7
11:10 AM11:10

Emily Horowitz on Moral Panics

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Emily Horowitz will talk about her ongoing research on how moral panics inform our sex offense legal regime; she’s teaching a new course this semester on “Sex Crimes and American Justice” in the American Studies/Criminal Justice department.

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Mar
3
to Mar 5

Beyond the Bars Conference 2017: Transcending the Punishment Paradigm

The Beyond the Bars Conference, now going into its 7th year, is an annual event that brings together a trans-disciplinary group to advance the work of ending mass incarceration and mass criminalization and building a just and safe society. Each year scholars, students, activists, advocates, policy makers, government officials and those who have been most directly impacted by issues of incarceration and criminalization come together for three days to deepen our collective analysis, strengthen our network of those working for change and make visible the many ways those from the academy and the community can engage in action.

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