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Events

Mar
26
11:10 AM11:10

Downtown Community TV Center: PRO-TV’s NYC youth on teenage homelessness, coping with illnesses, and the difficult lives of young immigrants

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips

Downtown Community TV Center: PRO-TV’s NYC youth on teenage homelessness, coping with illnesses, and the difficult lives of young immigrants

PRO-TV is the largest, most honored free media arts training program for youth in New York City. Since its inception in 1978, PRO-TV has offered intensive video workshops, where 200+ youth a year create exemplary films that address the issues affecting their lives and their communities. PRO-TV teaching artists mentor students through a rich curriculum of formal workshops and field experience.  


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Apr
2
11:10 AM11:10

Chase Madar on Mass Incarceration: Race, Law, & Economics

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

April 2: Journalist Chase Madar on Mass Incarceration: Race, Law, & Economics

Journalist and Attorney Chase Madar (Author, The Passion of Chelsea Manning) will discuss the challenges of dismantling mass incarceration simply by reforming law. He’ll address issues such as the rights of the defendant and the need to move “beyond law” in efforts to reduce the prison-industrial complex. 

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Apr
9
11:10 AM11:10

Criminologist Shawn Rolfe on “An Ex-Con Is Not Supposed to be Doing This: Obtaining a Doctorate Degree, Becoming a Scholar and Policy Advocate”

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Criminologist Shawn Rolfe on “An Ex-Con Is Not Supposed to be Doing This: Obtaining a Doctorate Degree, Becoming a Scholar and Policy Advocate”

Shawn Rolfe is a former Marine and current Ph.D. candidate in criminal justice at the University of Louisville. His advocacy with North Carolina's Local Reentry Council and Second Chance Alliance informs his current research focused on veterans, mental health, and reentry and the study of sex offense policies. His scholarly work on homeless shelters’ policies for sex offenders was highlighted and cited in an amicus brief (Bethea v. North Carolina), and is currently before the U.S. Supreme Court; most recently he co-authored the chapter “Violence in Prison” with Dr. Richard Tewksbury in book, American Prisons & Jails (2018).


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Apr
16
11:10 AM11:10

Anna Gjika on Technology, Masculinity, and Rape Culture in Adolescent Sexual Assault

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Anna Gjika on Technology, Masculinity, and Rape Culture in Adolescent Sexual Assault

Anna Gjika is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her research interests include exploring the relationships between gender, crime, and technology, particularly as they pertain to gendered violence, and institutional responses to this issue. Her current project seeks to (1) examine the interplay between identity, status, transgression, and new media for young people growing up digital, and (2) explore the ways technology intersects with sexual abuse to create new forms of crime, new ways to victimize and perpetuate harm, as well as new opportunities to investigate and address sexual violence both through the criminal justice system and in the public.

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Apr
23
11:10 AM11:10

SFC Post-Prison Students on Reentry and the Benefits of Post-Prison Education

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

SFC Post-Prison Students on Reentry and the Benefits of Post-Prison Education

The Post-Prison Program at SFC launched in 2014 and both students, professors, and community members have found the program to be a triumph among reentry opportunities. Our Program was inspired by Hudson Link and other nonprofit organizations that privately fund and run college programs in prisons and seeks to help this population finish their degrees during the re-entry process. In May 2018, our first cohort of three students graduated, and we currently have 11 enrolled students. This panel features students discussing the importance of higher education for formerly incarcerated men and women, as well issues related to re-entry challenges, the realities of mass incarceration policies, and experiences of solitary confinement. The students will shed light on other less-tangible benefits of the SFC Program, including the structure provided by the program, safety, support, a heightened sense of belonging, improved self-esteem, and skills necessary for academic mastery.

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Apr
30
11:10 AM11:10

Debbie Nathan on the Humanitarian Crisis at the Border

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

April 30: Journalist Debbie Nathan on the Humanitarian Crisis at the Border

 Debbie Nathan lives in Brownsville, Texas, on the Mexico border, and has been writing about the border and immigration for over three decades. She currently writes for The Appeal, and her ground-breaking coverage of the child separation crisis at the border for The Intercept and other publications drew mass national and international attention.

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Mar
12
11:10 AM11:10

Historian Paula Marie Seniors on African American Women & Radical Activism/Self-Defense

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Historian Paula Marie Seniors on African American Women Radical Activists: African American Women & Radical Activism/Self-Defense

Professor Paula Marie Seniors (Associate Professor of Africana Studies, Virginia Tech) discusses the 1961 case of self-defense advocate Mae Mallory and the Monroe Defense Committee. She discusses the aftermath of the case and the efforts of Mallory and other Black radical women activists’ travels to Tanzania, Grenada, and Nicaragua, to participate in socialist revolutions. Seniors is author of Mae Mallory, the Monroe Defense Committee and World Revolutions: African American Women Radical Activists (1956-1987) (University of Georgia Press) and she won the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Prize, from the Association of Black Women Historians for Beyond Lift Every Voice and Sing: The Culture of Uplift, Identity and Politics in Black Musical Theater (Ohio State University Press, 2009). Seniors co-edited Michelle Obama’s Impact on African American Women and Girls (Palgrave MacMillan)  and is currently working on Michelle Obama’s Silence: Police and State Violence Against African American Girls and Women.

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Mar
11
6:00 PM18:00

After Rikers: Justice By Design Screening and Panel Discussion

After Rikers FlyerJPEG.jpg

March 11 (Monday at 6pm in Founder’s Hall) Screening of newly-released documentary: Justice By Design: On the Conversation to Close Rikers Island / with Panel and Discussion

Rikers has become synonymous with the worst aspects of New York City’s criminal justice system. The prison is known for its entrenched culture of violence and poor conditions; last year, Mayor De Blasio announced the city would close Rikers by 2027. This film examines structural policies governing incarceration and ways the city can “reimagine a justice system that centers on healthy individuals, families, and communities” and begin to change the culture of the city’s jail system. Rikers is made up of eight facilities and is used primarily to incarcerate people being held before trial. It also houses a smaller population of inmates who have been sentenced to less than a year. This film explores issues that architects and planners must consider before simply closing the facility, and the need to reexamine ideas of incarcerations and structural problems in communities beyond simply incarceration.

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Mar
5
11:10 AM11:10

Criminologist Natasha Frost on Assessing the Impacts of Suicide on Correction Officer Wellbeing

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Criminologist Natasha Frost on Correctional Officer Suicide and Officer Wellbeing

Professor Natasha Frost (Northeastern University) is an expert in the study of punishment and social control. Specifically, she is interested in mass incarceration and the effects of incarceration on individuals, families, and communities. She has served as a consultant for the Massachusetts State Parole Board, worked collaboratively with the Massachusetts Department of Correction, and conducted correctional program assessment and recidivism studies for several Massachusetts counties. More recently she has been awarded federal funding to study the effects of mass incarceration on the community and on the well-being of those who work in correctional settings. Her book, The Punishment Imperative: The Rise and Failure of Mass Incarceration in America, co-authored with Todd R. Clear was published in 2014 by NYU Press. Other publications have appeared in Justice Quarterly, Criminology & Public Policy, Punishment & Society, Crime, Law and Social Change, and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society.

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Feb
27
6:00 PM18:00

Film Screening: UNTOUCHABLE / with Panel

  • St. Francis College, Maroney Forum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Spring 2019 Lecture Series & Other Sociology & Criminal Justice Events

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow
Co-Directors Sp 2019: Profs. Horowitz  & Lowrey-Kinberg & Phillips

Film Screening: UNTOUCHABLE / with Q&A

When the most powerful lobbyist in Florida discovers that the nanny has sexually abused his daughter, he harnesses his extraordinary political power to pass the toughest sex offender laws in the nation. UNTOUCHABLE chronicles his crusade, and its impact on the lives of several of the 900,000+ people forced to live under the kinds of laws he has championed. The film interweaves intimate portraits of those branded sex offenders with the heartbreaking stories of those who have suffered sexual abuse. It is a film that pushes viewers toward an uncomfortable place, requiring them to walk in the shoes of those who have survived sexual abuse, but to still bear witness to the experiences of those we revile. UNTOUCHABLE won the Maysles New Documentary Director Award at the Tribeca Film Festival; a panel discussion, in collaboration with CJ 3016 (Sex Crimes and American Justice), will follow the screening.

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Feb
27
2:00 PM14:00

Film Screening: CUBA AND THE CAMERAMAN w/Director Jon Alpert

  • St. Francis College, Room 6404 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Spring 2019 Lecture Series & Other Sociology & Criminal Justice Events

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**(unless noted)

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow
Co-Directors Sp 2019: Profs. Horowitz  & Lowrey-Kinberg & Phillips

February 27 (Wednesday / Room 6404 at 2pm): Film Screening: CUBA AND THE CAMERAMAN w/Director Jon Alpert (Organized by Dr. Halyna Lemekh)

Emmy-winning filmmaker Jon Alpert chronicles the fortunes of three Cuban families over the course of four tumultuous decades in the nation's history. Alpert will attend the screening and participate in a Q & A following the film.

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Feb
26
11:10 AM11:10

Journalist Lenore Skenazy on Free Range Kids Laws

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Journalist Lenore Skenazy on Free Range Kids Laws

New York City-based journalist, activist, and founder of the “free-range parenting” movement discusses her experience of being publicly shamed for being the “world’s worst mom.” She expands on her decade of activism around “free-range kids” legal, political, and journalistic advocacy and the role media play in fear-based parenting. She outlines her influence on a spate of new laws that prohibit criminal sanctions against parents for allowing children to play unsupervised in a park or walk home from school alone.

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Feb
19
11:10 AM11:10

Tabloid Justice, She-Devils, Femme Fatales, and the Amanda Knox Case

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Tabloid Justice, She-Devils, Femme Fatales, and the Amanda Knox Case

Nickie Phillips (Associate Professor, SFC) discusses the investigation, conviction, and ultimate acquittal of American college student Amanda Knox in the murder of her roommate in Italy. Prof. Phillips applies a cultural criminological framework analyzing how persistent gendered myths around female sexual deviance informed the investigation, conviction, and eventual acquittal of Knox, with a focus on the role of media in this miscarriage of justice.

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Feb
12
11:10 AM11:10

Criminologist David Pitts on Solitary Confinement in America: Causes, Consequences, and Alternatives

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow

Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips 

Criminologist David Pitts on Solitary Confinement in America: Causes, Consequences, and Alternatives

David Pitts is a Senior Research Associate in the Center on Sentencing & Corrections at the Vera Institute of Justice. David leads Vera’s research agenda on the conditions on confinement in American prisons and jails, and he is currently working on research about solitary confinement, jail visitation, and correctional education. Prior to joining Vera, David was a research affiliate with the Center for Evidence-Based Corrections at the University of California, Irvine. He spent ten years as a professor of public administration and policy before working in criminal justice reform.

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Feb
5
11:10 AM11:10

Bob Gangi on Court Monitoring and the Failure of Broken Windows

 

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow
Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips

Advocate Bob Gangi on Court Monitoring and the Failure of Broken Windows

Bob Gangi has been an activist, community organizer and public policy advocate in New York City for over 40 years. In 2011, he founded the Police Reform Organizing Project; prior to this, he served as Executive Director of the Correctional Association for over 29 years. A recognized expert on criminal justice and law enforcement issues with a particular focus on police and prison concerns, Gangi has written or co-written numerous op-ed pieces for the New York Times, Newsday, and Albany Times Union. In 2012 Robert was the recipient of the American Ethical Union’s prestigious Elliott-Black Award, acknowledging his enduring dedication to the rights of vulnerable people caught up in the criminal justice system and his life’s work fighting for sweeping prison and police reform.

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Jan
29
11:10 AM11:10

Diane Redleaf on “They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk"

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Critical Perspectives on Law/Media/Crime/Justice

**Tuesdays at 11:10 am in 4202**

Free & Open to the Public // Receptions to Follow
Co-Directors Spring 2019: Profs. Emily Horowitz // Belen Lowrey-Kinberg // Nickie Phillips

Attorney Diane Redleaf on “They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk"

 Nationally-known leaders have called Diane L. Redleaf, author of They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk (Praeger, 2018), the “conscience of the child welfare system,” the driving force behind creating a “better, fairer child welfare system” and “the people’s lawyer.” A civil rights lawyer for families in the child welfare system since she settled in Chicago in 1979 after graduating from Stanford Law School, Diane has played a leading role in hundreds of important cases on behalf of families, with over 60 published court opinions and led legislative efforts that have benefited millions of children and families.


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Nov
29
12:20 PM12:20

Q&A with Yance Ford, Director of Strong Island

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 29 - **Thursday @ 12:20** - Q&A with Yance Ford, Director of Strong Island

Yance Ford is the director of Strong Island, winner of the Special Jury Award for Storytelling at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and Academy Award nominee. Ford is a member of the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program, a MacDowell Colony fellow, a Creative Capital Grantee (Theo Westenberger Award) and has been featured in Filmmaker Magazine's 25 New Faces of Independent Film. He is a former Series Producer of POV, a graduate of Hamilton College and the Production Workshop at Third World Newsreel. The Guardian called Strong Island one of the finest documentaries of 2017.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
27
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: Strong Island

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 27 - Film Screening: Strong Island (Directed by Yance Ford, 2017)

Excerpt about STRONG ISLAND (2017 Academy Award nominee) from The New Yorker: "In Yance Ford's powerful, disturbing, and very personal documentary, details are important. What happened in 1992 was the murder of Yance's own brother, William Ford, Jr., who grew up in the black enclave of Central Islip. He was shot in the chest with a rifle by Mark Reilly, a young white man. The shop's owner had a record of running a shady business. William Ford had no record and was about to take the entrance exam to be a corrections officer. Ford's mother, Barbara Dunmore Ford, an educator who founded Rosewood, a school for women on Rikers Island, says in ‘Strong Island’ that she will believe until her dying day that the grand jury of twenty-three white people did not return a true bill because her son was a black man. As the documentary makes plain, the grand jury didn't care to find out what really happened."

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
20
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: What Happened Miss Simone?

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 20 - Film Screening: What Happened Miss Simone? Followed by Q&A with Prof. Sara Rzeszutek (History, St. Francis College)
Directed by Liz Garbus, this film chronicles the life of American singer Nina Simone, who became a civil rights activist and moved to Liberia following the turbulence of the 1960s. The documentary combines previously unreleased archival footage and interviews with Simone's daughter and friends. The screening will be followed by a Q & A with Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, author of James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement (University of Kentucky Press, 2015). 

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
13
11:10 AM11:10

Film Screening: Riker's An American Jail & Q & A with St. Francis Post-Prison Students

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 13 - Film Screening: Riker's An American Jail & Q & A with St. Francis Post-Prison Students (Moderated by Johnny Perez, St. Francis ‘2018, and Director of U.S. Prisons Program, National Campaign Against Torture)
 

RIKERS: AN AMERICAN JAIL, is an award-winning documentary from Bill Moyers that brings you face to face with those who have endured incarceration at Rikers Island. The U.S. is facing a crisis of mass incarceration with over 2.2 million people packed into its prisons. Almost 80% of the 7500 people detained at Riker’s have not yet been found guilty or innocent of the charges they face. All are at risk in the pervasive culture of violence that forces people to come to terms with what they must do for their own survival. Their stories in Rikers vividly describe the cruel arc of the Rikers experience-from the shock of entry, to the extortion and control exercised by other inmates, the oppressive interaction with corrections officers, the beatings and stabbings, the torture of solitary confinement and the many challenges of returning to the outside world.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Nov
6
11:10 AM11:10

Transitions in the Women's Movement: From Sexual Liberation to Carceral Feminism

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

November 6 - Transitions in the Women's Movement: From Sexual Liberation to Carceral Feminism Judith Levine (Author/Journalist)
 

Judith Levine is the author of 4 books and countless articles exploring politics, policy, and the intersection of sex and justice. Levine is best known for Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children From Sex, winner of 2002 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and named by SIECUS, the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, as one of history's most influential books about sexuality. She is also the author of Not Buying It: My Year Without Shopping (2015), a journal examining consumerism and anti-consumerist movements. Not Buying It has been translated into five languages.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
30
11:10 AM11:10

They Said No to Nixon: The Heroes in the Nixon Administration Who Took Him Down

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 30 - They Said No to Nixon: The Heroes in the Nixon Administration Who Took Him Down Michael Koncewicz (Tamiment Library, NYU)
Michael Koncewicz has taught History at St. Francis and directs the Cold War archival collections at NYU’s Tamiment Library. He received his Ph.D. in History at UC Irvine (2014) and is the author of They Said No to Nixon: Republicans Who Stood Up to the President's Abuses of Power (University of California Press, 2018).

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
23
11:10 AM11:10

J. Edgar Hoover: Sex, Lies & Political History

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 23 - J. Edgar Hoover: Sex, Lies & Political History Claire Potter (History, The New School)

Claire Potter is a professor of History at The New School, Executive Editor of Public Seminar, and Director of the Digital Humanities Initiative. She researches post-1970 U.S. history, political history, the histories of gender and sexuality, and mass culture. She is author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-men, and the Politics of Mass Culture (1998); Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (2012); & Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (2012). She is the author of the column "Tenured Radical" (now her Twitter handle) at The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as articles for Dissent, The Village Voice, Inside Higher Education, and Jacobin.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
20
8:30 AM08:30

Graphic Justice Discussions 2018 featuring Ann Nocenti

The Graphic Justice Research Alliance (GJRA) is delighted to announce a call for papers for its annual conference at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY to be held October 20, 2018. The theme for this year’s Graphic Justice Discussions is ‘Law, Comics, Justice’, and promises to be an exciting event that will be accessible and relevant to scholars, artists, practitioners, policy-makers, writers, and the general public alike.

We are gratified to announce that legendary comic writer and editor Ann Nocenti will join us as this event’s keynote speaker. Nocenti has lent her distinctive voice to numerous beloved comic book runs, including her writings for Marvel’s Daredevil and DC’s Catwoman, Katana, and Green Arrow. We very much look forward to hearing her observations about the industry, as well as reflections on her latest project, the forthcoming The Seeds, a new four-issue series in collaboration with artist David Aja. The series, part of a new line of Berger Books published by Dark Horse Comics, is described as “An eco-fiction tech-thriller … a story of love beyond race and gender, and of the resilience of both human and animal kind.”

Please join us for what promises to be a stimulating and inclusive occasion!

The GJRA is a multidisciplinary research network exploring the crossover between law and justice and comics of all kinds.

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Oct
16
11:10 AM11:10

Becoming an Activist: Dr. Frank Greene Honors Program Lecture

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 16 - **Founder’s Hall ** Becoming an Activist - Dr. Frank Greene Honors Program Lecture

Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs (St. Francis graduate/fashion designer/Co-coordinator of Women’s March)

Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs is a St. Francis graduate, and served as Youth Initiative Coordinator of the Women's March. A fashion activist who runs the zero waste clothing label, Tabii Just, she’s also an advocate for fair and ethical labor for garment workers, and educates people about the global effects of fast fashion on small manufacturing communities. She advocates for zero waste in the fashion industry and for methods of reducing waste for a fashion brand from the first step of sourcing fabric or designing to empowering the customer with knowledge to re-usable packing materials. She has shown collections during New York Fashion Week and dressed prominent women for the red carpet. Her work has been exhibited at Princeton University and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Museum, and also writes about raising a biracial child in America with her husband on her blog and in several publications.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Oct
9
11:10 AM11:10

Family Separation: A First Hand Guide to Chaos on the Border

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

October 9 - Family Separation: A First Hand Guide to Chaos on the Border Debbie Nathan (Author/Journalist)

Debbie Nathan is a Texas-based journalist & one of the first journalists to report on the recent family separation policies. A journalist, editor and translator for over 3 decades, specializing in immigration and sexual politics and sex panics, and author of 4 books, including Sybil, Inc., Debbie's work has won numerous national and regional awards, including: The H.L. Mencken Award for Investigative Journalism, the PEN West Award for Journalism, the Texas Institute of Letters Award for feature journalism, the Hugh Hefner First Amendment Award for Journalism, and the John Bartlow Martin Award from Northwestern for Public Service Journalism. 

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Sep
25
11:10 AM11:10

Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 25 - Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock Amy Werbel (Art History, Fashion Institute of Technology)

Amy Werbel is an associate professor of Art History at the Fashion Institute of Technology, & author numerous works on the subject of American visual culture and sexuality, including Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of American Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock (Columbia University Press, 2018), which was praised in Kirkus Reviews as "an incisive history of the futility of censorship;" and Thomas Eakins: Art, Medicine, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia (Yale University Press, 2007), which was praised in The New England Journal of Medicine as "a rigorous academic review that is readable and enjoyable." In 2011-2012 she was a Fulbright scholar in China, where she taught & lectured on topics including censorship.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Sep
18
11:10 AM11:10

The FBI's War on Black Bookstores

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 18 - The FBI's War on Black Bookstores Joshua Clark Davis (History, University of Baltimore) on The FBI's War on Black Bookstores
Joshua Clark Davis is an assistant professor of History at the University of Baltimore. His book, From Head Shops to Whole Foods: The Rise and Fall of Activist Entrepreneurs (Columbia University Press, 2017) examines how natural foods stores, head shops, feminist businesses, and African American booksellers emerged from social movements in the 1960s to advance the goals of political transformation and cultural liberation.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Sep
11
11:10 AM11:10

Forgiveness and Redemption in an Age of Mass Incarceration 

FALL 2018 SENIOR LECTURE SERIES// CHALLENGE & CHANGE: CRITIQUING THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE PRESENTS: 

September 11 - Forgiveness and Redemption in an Age of Mass Incarceration 
A Conversation w/David Garlock & Stephen Chu

David Garlock was a client of Bryan Stevenson while serving 13 years in prison - he was sentenced at 20. After his release, Stevenson helped Garlock enter his alma mater, Eastern University, where Garlock earned his college degree. Garlock will talk about mercy, forgiveness, and the criminal justice system with Stephen Chu, who served as a Staff Attorney at the Equal Justice Initiative from 2009 - 2017; Chu is currently a Supervising Attorney at the NYC Office of the Appellate Defender.

SERIES Co-Directors: Athena Devlin (English & American Studies) & Emily Horowitz (Sociology & Criminal Justice)

St. Francis College

180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY
Events in Lecture Hall 4202 on Tuesdays at 11:10am **unless otherwise noted

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Apr
3
1:20 PM13:20

Debbie Nathan on Immigrants as Crime Victims

Debbie Nathan is a renowned journalist who currently specializes in writing about immigration issues especially along the U.S.-Mexico border.

On Tuesday, April 3, she'll be sharing her knowledge on immigrants as victims of crime at SFC - in particular the resources available to them and the factors behind their hesitancy to report victimization. 

When: Tuesday, April 3rd from 1:20-2:45

Where: Room 6306.

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Feb
13
11:10 AM11:10

Deborah Gray White, Women Slaves in the Antebellum South

The Senior Citizen Lecture Series Welcomes: Deborah Gray White, Women Slaves in the Antebellum South

Author of the groundbreaking Ar’n’t I A Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South, Deborah Gray White is the Board of Governors Professor of History and Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. Her other works include: Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower; Let My People Go: African Americans 1800-1865; and Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves.

Series Director: Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, History Department, St. Francis College

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Feb
6
11:10 AM11:10

Historian and Pulitzer Prize Winner Steven Hahn, Pre-Civil War Politics

The Senior Citizen Lecture Series welcomes Historian and Pulitzer Prize Winner Steven Hahn, Pre-Civil War Politics

Steven Hahn, winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in History, is Professor of History at New York University. He is author of A Nation Without Borders:The United States and its World in an Age of Civil Wars, 1830-1910; The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom; and A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration.

Series Director: Prof. Sara Rzeszutek, History Department, St. Francis College

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Jan
25
9:35 AM09:35

Murray Lee on Fear of Crime

Prof. Murray Lee

Prof. Murray Lee

Prof. Murray Lee, University of Sydney Law School, will join us to speak about fear of crime.

"Murray Lee is a Professor in Criminology at the University of Sydney Law School. He has been a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and the University of Liverpool. He is the author of Inventing Fear of Crime: Criminology and the Politics of Anxiety, co-author of Policing and Media: Public Relations, Simulations and Communications, co-editor of Fear of Crime: Critical Voices in an Age of Anxiety, and editor of the scholarly journal Current Issues in Criminal Justice. Murray’s research focuses broadly on representations and perceptions of crime and how these lead to processes of criminalisation. This includes the increasing mediatization of crime and crime control and the development of new forms of media and communication that both create new crime risks and new anxieties, but also new forms of surveillance, control and governance." 

Dr. Murray most recently co-edited the 2018 The Routledge International Handbook on Fear of Crime published in 2018 by Routledge.

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Dec
5
11:10 AM11:10

Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Dec. 5: Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

Dr. Kathleen Gray is a sociologist and the Assistant Academic Dean at St. Francis College. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh with a research focus on race and racism. Her work explores how white people collectively construct, reinforce, and occasionally disrupt dominant racial ideology during conversations about race and politics. She also works on critical pedagogy and is the creator of a segregation simulation called The Neighborhood Game, which is used in sociology courses throughout the country to teach students about structural inequality.

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