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Events


Apr
25
11:10 am11:10

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

-- Prof. Phillips will talk about her new book that traces ways that sexual violence is collectively processed, mediated, negotiated, and contested by exploring public reactions to high-profile incidents and rape narratives in popular culture.

Apr
18
11:10 am11:10

Shannen Dee Williams on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return engagement! Guest Speaker: Shannen Dee Williams (History, University of Tennessee) on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

-- Dr. Williams is currently working on her book, “Subversive Habits: Black Nuns and the Long Struggle to Desegregate Catholic America.” She will return to SFC this spring to talk more about her groundbreaking study chronicling the epic journey of black Catholic sisters from their fiercely contested beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present day and the largely hidden history of the fight to dismantle racial and gender barriers in the U.S. Church and wider American society.

Apr
11
11:10 am11:10

Kay Hymowitz on Brooklyn Today

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Kay Hymowitz on her new book: Brooklyn Today -- Just decades ago, the Brooklyn stereotype was typified by television programs such as “The Honeymooners” and “Welcome Back, Kotter”—comedies about working-class sensibilities, deprivation, and struggles. Today, the borough across the East River from Manhattan is home to trendsetters, celebrities, and enough “1 percenters” to draw the Occupy Wall Street protests across the Brooklyn Bridge. “Tres Brooklyn,” has become a compliment among gourmands in Parisian restaurants. Hymowitz chronicles the policies and events that transformed the borough so dramatically and considers whether the borough’s new wealth will lift up some of the borough’s most blighted neighborhoods

Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration
Apr
11
9:00 am09:00

Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration

  • Tumblr

This forum will bring together a range of leaders in the criminal justice field to talk about strategies that can reduce both violence and mass incarceration.  The day’s dynamic conversations and interviews will be organized around four key principles outlined in a recent Common Justice report—exploring responses to violence that are centered on survivors, based in accountability, driven by safety, and racially equitable.  

 

This event is sponsored by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations

Apr
4
11:10 am11:10

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction -- With help from SFC criminal justice professor Don Savatta, Carl Dukes was freed from prison in July 2016. Dukes spent almost 20 years in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murdering a 23-year-old student at the University of Albany in 1997. Dukes will return to SFC to talk about his struggle to re-enter society and build his life today. Dukes was exonerated after another man confessed to killing the student.

Mar
28
11:10 am11:10

Katherine Parkin on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202en

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Katherine Parkin (History, Monmouth University) on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

This talk considers the 100+ year debate in American society about whether or not women or men are better drivers. Parkin argues that we never use the term man driver and found that people only asked the question to assert male superiority, even when the evidence discovered women as comparably good or better drivers. This talk speaks to a notion of identity and argues that we face an entrenched sexism that most people aren't aware of, including their own prejudiced views – and brings the debate up into the modern day, with dismissal of women as drivers persisting.

Mar
21
11:10 am11:10

Lloyd Handwerker on the history of Nathan's Hot Dogs

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Guest Speaker and Film Screening: Lloyd Handwerker, author/film-maker on the history of Nathan’s Hot Dogs (and a grandson of Nathan’s founder Nathan Handwerker).

Mar
7
11:10 am11:10

Emily Horowitz on Moral Panics

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Emily Horowitz will talk about her ongoing research on how moral panics inform our sex offense legal regime; she’s teaching a new course this semester on “Sex Crimes and American Justice” in the American Studies/Criminal Justice department.

Mar
3
Mar 5

Beyond the Bars Conference 2017: Transcending the Punishment Paradigm

  • Columbia University

The Beyond the Bars Conference, now going into its 7th year, is an annual event that brings together a trans-disciplinary group to advance the work of ending mass incarceration and mass criminalization and building a just and safe society. Each year scholars, students, activists, advocates, policy makers, government officials and those who have been most directly impacted by issues of incarceration and criminalization come together for three days to deepen our collective analysis, strengthen our network of those working for change and make visible the many ways those from the academy and the community can engage in action.

Feb
28
11:10 am11:10

Arnold Sparr "on Single out the Draft Boards: The Catholic Left's Campaign Against the Vietnam War"

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Historian Arnold Sparr and members of the Catholic Worker will speak on “Single out the Draft Boards: The Catholic Left's Campaign Against the Vietnam War”

Feb
24
12:30 pm12:30

Place and Punishment in an Era of Mass Incarceration

  • Vera Institute of Justice

Over the last four decades, mass imprisonment transformed the character of poverty and community life in the United States. However, few studies have examined community conditions of incarceration beyond large, metropolitan cities. In an analysis of a unique spatial dataset of prison admissions in Massachusetts (1973-2014), Prof. Jessica Simes will explore the historical trajectory of mass incarceration as it relates to local conditions of racial segregation, poverty, crime, and patterns of social control. Findings show racial disparities in incarceration vary distinctly by place—across metropolitan cities, smaller central cities, suburbs, and towns. In addition, the spatial pattern of imprisonment has changed dramatically over the course of the prison boom, pointing to isolated urban and suburban areas with extreme levels of state prison admissions and a pattern of “concentrated decarceration” in Boston. In sum, mass incarceration emerged not just to manage distinctively urban social problems but was characteristic of a broader mode of governance that could be seen in communities often far-removed from deep inner-city poverty.

Feb
21
11:10 am11:10

Freedom Rider and Civil Rights Leader Bernard Lafayette

  • St. Francis College, Founder's Hall

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Freedom Rider and Civil Rights Leader Bernard Lafayette (*in Founder’s Hall)

21-year-old Bernard Lafayette hailed from Tampa, FL and was enrolled as an undergraduate at Nashville's American Baptist Theological Seminary. A veteran of the Nashville sit-ins, Lafayette had already staged a successful impromptu Freedom Ride with his close friend and fellow student activist John Lewis in 1959, while traveling home for Christmas break, when they decided to exercise their rights as interstate passengers by sitting in the front of a bus from Nashville, TN to Birmingham, AL. As part of the May 17 Nashville Student Movement Ride, Lafayette endured jail time in Birmingham, riots and firebombings in Montgomery, AL, an arrest in Jackson, MS and jail time at Parchman State Prison Farm during June 1961. After the end of the Freedom Riders campaign, he worked on voting rights and helped to coordinate the 1968 Poor Peoples Campaign. He completed a doctorate in Education at Harvard University and for several years was the Director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches at Emory University and conducts nonviolent workshops worldwide. (Bio and photo from The American Experience/PBS).

Feb
15
Feb 16

12th Annual Harry Frank Guggeheim Symposium on Crime in America - Justice in the Trump Era: The State of American Criminal Justice (2017 and Beyond)

As a new administration takes office in Washington, examining the challenges of the U.S. criminal justice system—and the prospects for change---has never been so critical. We’ve invited some of the nation’s leading justice professionals, academics, practitioners, and journalists to give us their first take on justice in the Trump era. Please join us on Feb 16-17! 

A registration fee of $25 will allow you entry to all sessions on either or both days (including continental breakfast).

The symposium is organized by John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice. 

Feb
14
11:10 am11:10

Sara Haviland on James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Sara Haviland on James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

Prof. Haviland will talk about her recent book on the Jacksons, a married couple based in Brooklyn who worked together in the Black Freedom Movement with an emphasis on black freedom in the 1930s and 1940s.

Feb
7
11:10 am11:10

Ian Maloney on Breaking Boundaries in Brooklyn, New York's Bookish Borough

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Ian Maloney (English) on “Breaking Boundaries in Brooklyn, New York’s Bookish Borough” -- Prof. Maloney teaches a course at St. Francis on “Brooklyn: Film & Fiction”.

Feb
3
2:30 pm14:30

Movie Screening of "Chapter & Verse: A Harlem Story"

  • Mist Harlem

Synopsis:

After serving eight years in prison, reformed gang leader S. Lance Ingram re-enters society and struggles to adapt to a changed Harlem. Living under the tough supervision of a parole officer in a halfway house, he is unable to find a job that will let him use the technological skills he gained in prison. Lance is forced to take a job delivering for a food pantry where he befriends Ms. Maddy (LORETTA DEVINE), a strong and spirited grandmother, and assumes responsibility for her 15-year- old grandson Ty, a promising student who is pulled into a dangerous street gang. When gang members decide to punish Ty for disobeying the “law of the streets,” Lance risks sacrificing his “second chance” at freedom so that Ty can have a “first chance” at a better life.

SCREENING TIMES

  1. Fri, February 3, 2017, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  2. Fri, February 3, 2017, 2:30 PM – 4:15 PM EST
  3. Fri, February 3, 2017, 5:15 PM – 7:00 PM EST
  4. Sat, February 4, 2017, 2:30 PM – 4:15 PM EST
Jan
31
11:10 am11:10

Alexandra Pierre on Mothers and Prison

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Alexandra Pierre on Mothers and Prison -- More than 56% of women in federal prison report that they are mothers, the vast majority of them nonviolent drug offenders serving harsh sentences. When Alexandra went to prison, like many women, she left her daughter behind. Now Alexandra is working on a doctorate in sociology and studying the effects of maternal incarceration on children.

Jan
24
11:10 am11:10

Holocaust survivor Fred Terna on Art and the Holocaust

  • St. Francis College, Callahan Center

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Holocaust survivor Fred Terna on Art and the Holocaust -- Fred Terna is a painter and Brooklynite who spent over 3 years in German concentration camps. An exhibit of his work currently hangs in Callahan Center.

Jan
21
2:45 pm14:45

Peace & Justice contingent @ the Women’s March on NYC

  • St. Francis College

Join the Peace & Justice contingent @ the Women’s March on NYC. Meet in SFC Lobby at 2:45pm; Peace & Justice group is scheduled to enter the march at Dag Hammerskjold Plaza at 3:45pm. RSVP to Emily Horowitz (ehorowitz@sfc.edu); please note the SFC bus to DC is now full.

Jan
21
11:00 am11:00

Women's March on NYC

  • Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, 833 1st Avenue NYC

On January 21st, New York City will proudly join the international community to march in support of equality and promote civil rights for every human. This historic and peaceful event is open to the public and we warmly welcome ALL to participate.

Dec
6
11:10 am11:10

Carl Dukes' First Speaking Engagement on his Wrongful Conviction

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Carl Dukes, wrongfully convicted of murder will speak at SFC along with Professor and attorney Don Savatta.

SFC professor and attorney Don Savatta will discuss his work securing the exoneration of Carl Dukes in July 2016. Dukes spent almost 20 years in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murdering a 23-year-old student at the University of Albany in 1997. In July, he had his conviction vacated, with the help of Professor Savatta. Dukes will join Savatta and describe his experience serving almost two decades in prison for a crime he did not commit. This is the first time that Dukes has spoken publicly to an audience about this case. Dukes was exonerated after another man confessed to killing the student; Savatta will play a clip of the confession.

Nov
29
11:10 am11:10

Challenges Facing Unaccompanied Child Immigrants to the US: A Legal Perspective

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

11/29: Challenges Facing Unaccompanied Child Immigrants to the US: A Legal Perspective
A lawyer from KIND will discuss the challenges facing unaccompanied children who enter the US immigration system alone. KIND’s mission is to ensure that no child appears in court without an attorney. They work to achieve fundamental fairness through high-quality legal representation and by advancing the child's best interests, safety, and well-being. Unaccompanied children apprehended at the border face deportation proceedings; the majority must make their claim for protection without a lawyer. The result: children can be sent back to situations where their well-being, and even their lives, are in danger. The majority of the children KIND serves have fled severe violence in their home countries. Many have been threatened or attacked by gangs, abandoned, abused, exploited, or trafficked. They come seeking safety, but find new challenges in the U.S.

Nov
22
11:10 am11:10

Jane Anna Gordon on The Black-Jewish Conflict over Community Control in Ocean Hill-Brownsville

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

11/22: Jane Anna Gordon on The Black-Jewish Conflict over Community Control in Ocean Hill-Brownsville.
Dr. Jane Anna Gordon, a specialist in Africana political, social, and educational thought, modern and contemporary European social and political theory, methodologies in the social sciences, and contemporary slavery, is Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Connecticut and President of the Caribbean Philosophical Association. Her book, Why They Couldn’t Wait: A Critique of the Black-Jewish Conflict over Community Control in Ocean Hill-Brownsville (RoutledgeFalmer 2001), was listed by the Gotham Gazette as one of the four best recent books on civil rights. She is co-editor with Lewis R. Gordon of Not Only the Master’s Tools (Paradigm, 2006) and of The Companion to African American Studies; the co-author of Of Divine Warning: Reading Disaster in the Modern Age, and author of Creolizing Political Theory: Reading Rousseau through Fanon (Fordham, 2014). Her articles have appeared in the C.L.R. James Journal: A Review of Caribbean Ideas, Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy, Journal of Contemporary Thought, The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, Journal of Political Theology, Journal of Asian and African Studies, Performance Research, SOULS, and Philosophical Studies in Education.

Nov
15
11:10 am11:10

Shannen Dee Williams on The Real Sister Act: Black Nuns and the Long Struggle to Desegregate in U.S. Female Religious Life

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

11/15: Shannen Dee Williams on The Real Sister Act: Black Nuns and the Long Struggle to Desegregate in U.S. Female Religious Life
Dr. Shannen Dee Williams is a historian of the United States and the black Catholic diaspora and an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she teaches courses in U.S., African-American, women’s, civil rights, and religious history. Williams’s research on the forgotten histories of black Catholic sisters has been supported by a number of fellowships and awards. In this talk, Dr. Shannen Dee Williams will chart the fiercely-contested entry of African-descended women and girls into the nation's historically white Catholic sisterhoods from the early nineteenth-century to the present day.

Nov
8
11:10 am11:10

NOW THAT WE’RE MEN: Live performance

  • St. Francis College, Founder's hall

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE -- 11/8: NOW THAT WE’RE MEN: Live performance in Founder’s Hall. The new play, Now That We’re Men, by Katie Cappiello, is based on real conversations between teen boys about sex, sexuality, and gender. In the weeks leading up to prom, friendships in Now That We’re Men are put to the test…because Andrew must be gay, Marcus knocked-up his girl, Nick’s a little too addicted to fetish porn, Derek’s falling in love with Kelsey & Evan downed a handful of pills & pushed a hook-up too far. Hey, it’s high school. Time to man-up, right? Following the performance, Katie Cappiello will lead a talk-back with audience members and actors about the play.

Nov
1
11:10 am11:10

Arun Venugopal on the 2016 Election

  • St. Francis College, Room 4202

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

11/1: Arun Venugopal on the 2016 Election
Arun Venugopal is a reporter and the host of Micropolis, WNYC's ongoing examination of race, sexuality and identity. He is a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He has appeared on PBS Newshour, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, On the Media and Studio 360, and has been published in The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal and Salon.

Oct
26
6:30 pm18:30

Unpacking the Sex Offense Registry – a special panel discussion

  • Urban Justice Center

Unpacking the Sex Offense Registry – a special panel discussion

Wednesday, October 26 @ 6:30pm-8:30pm Urban Justice Center 40 Rector St., 9th floor, New York, NY

Reception to Follow RSVP required: ehorowitz@sfc.edu

Please join the NY Sex Offense Working Group and the Urban Justice Center for a special panel discussion, Unpacking the Registry. The New York State sex offense registry is up for discussion as well as offenses that cause people to listed. Panelists will also discuss re-entry challenges for those on the registry including residency restrictions. The context for state and national draconian sex offense policies that result in banishment and lifelong punishment will be examined. We will hear directly from those on the registry about the realities of being branded “sex offender” in a climate of fear and panic. There will be time for networking and socializing following the panel.

Panel participants include: Johnny Perez - moderator (Urban Justice Center) + Mary Beth Anderson on re-entry realities (Urban Justice Center) + Lauren Stephens-Davidowitz on residency restrictions (Office of the Appellate Defender) + Bill Dobbs on sex offenses in the context of moral panic (civil liberties activist & attorney) + First-hand experiences from registrants.

Oct
25
11:10 am11:10

Leymah Gbowee on the Women’s Peace Movement

  • St. Francis College, Founder's Hall

Fall 2016 Senior Lecture Series -

Tuesdays 11:10am in Room 4202 @ St. Francis College (180 Remsen Street /Brooklyn)

Co-Directors Fall 2016 Profs. Athena Devlin (American Studies) + Emily Horowitz (Sociology)
Events Sponsored By: American Studies, History, Crime & Popular Culture, Peace & Justice, Provost’s Office, Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Women’s Center

10/25 Leymah Gbowee on the Women’s Peace Movement (in Founder’s Hall – co-sponsored by the Honors Program).
Leymah Gbowee is a Liberian peace activist responsible for leading a women's peace movement, Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace that helped bring an end to the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003. Her efforts to end the war helped usher in a period of peace and enabled a free election in 2005. She, along with Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Tawakkul Karman, were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work.”