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Events


Dec
5
11:10 AM11:10

Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Dec. 5: Kathleen Gray - Imperceptible Privilege: How Whites Negotiate Conversations about Race

Dr. Kathleen Gray is a sociologist and the Assistant Academic Dean at St. Francis College. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh with a research focus on race and racism. Her work explores how white people collectively construct, reinforce, and occasionally disrupt dominant racial ideology during conversations about race and politics. She also works on critical pedagogy and is the creator of a segregation simulation called The Neighborhood Game, which is used in sociology courses throughout the country to teach students about structural inequality.

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Nov
28
11:10 AM11:10

Dr. Mical Raz - Making Child Abuse White? Parents Anonymous, Physicians and Child Abuse Policy in the 1970s 

Nov. 28: Dr. Mical Raz - Making Child Abuse White? Parents Anonymous, Physicians and Child Abuse Policy in the 1970s 

Mical Raz, MD, PhD, completed her medical training at Tel Aviv University, where she also received a Ph.D. in History of Medicine. She’s worked at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and volunteered with Physicians for Human Rights. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. She is the author Psychosurgery (U of Rochester 2013) and What's Wrong with the Poor? Race, Psychiatry and the War on Poverty (UNC 2013). A historian of American psychiatry, Raz is interested in the intersection of psychiatry, poverty and politics. Broadly, her new work focuses on how perceptions of mental health shaped child welfare services provided in the city of Philadelphia in the 1960s and early 1970s; she is interested in the history of child abuse laws in the mid-1960s, and their implication for treatment and prevention. She examines how child abuse came to be perceived as an individual problem rooted in the abuser’s psychopathology, rather than a broader social problem. She hopes to use her historical research to help inform current child welfare policy.

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Nov
21
11:10 AM11:10

Margee Kerr - Hijacking Fear: The subtle, and not so subtle ways politicians and the media use fear to motivate action

 SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Nov. 21: Margee Kerr - Hijacking Fear: The subtle, and not so subtle ways politicians and the media use fear to motivate action

Margee Kerr is a sociologist and author. She earned her Ph.D. in 2009 from the University of Pittsburgh and currently teaches and conducts research on fear, specifically how and why people engage with "scary" material. Dr. Kerr is the co-investigator on a first-of-its-kind study which measures how the brain and body respond to "fun-scary" experiences like haunted attractions, paranormal investigations, and thrill rides. She enjoys working as a consultant for attractions and museums and is the author of SCREAM: Chilling Adventures in the Science of fear, named a must read by The Washington Post. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Parade, Atlantic Monthly, and NPR’s Science Friday, among other places. 

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Nov
14
11:10 AM11:10

Belen Lowrey-Kinberg - The Application of Forensic Linguistics to Policing: The Case of Sandra Bland

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Nov. 14: Belen Lowrey-Kinberg - The Application of Forensic Linguistics to Policing: The Case of Sandra Bland

Professor Belen Lowrey-Kinberg (Assistant Professor, Sociology & Criminal Justice, St. Francis) gives an overview of forensic linguistics, examines the escalation of language in Sandra Bland’s traffic stop, and discuss how theories from criminal justice and linguistics can help us understand police-citizen dynamics. Lowrey-Kinberg will explores questions with implications for police-citizen interactions, such as: How did a routine traffic stop become such a violent encounter? What interactional factors could explain such rapidly escalating tensions between an officer and a civilian? Analysis based in the field of forensic linguistics provides some clues.

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Nov
7
11:10 AM11:10

Judith Levine and Professor Trevor Hoppe - The War on Sex

Nov. 7: Judith Levine and Professor Trevor Hoppe - The War on Sex

Judith Levine (noted journalist and author) and co-editor Trevor Hoppe (Assistant Professor, Sociology, SUNY Albany) discuss their important new work -- The War on Sex (Duke University Press).

“The past fifty years are conventionally understood to have witnessed an uninterrupted expansion of sexual rights and liberties in the United States. This state-of-the-art collection tells a different story: while progress has been made in marriage equality, reproductive rights, access to birth control, and other areas, government and civil society are waging a war on stigmatized sex by means of law, surveillance, and social control. The contributors document the history and operation of sex offender registries and the criminalization of HIV, as well as highly punitive measures against sex work that do more to harm women than to combat human trafficking. They reveal that sex crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes, while new legal and administrative regulations drastically restrict who is permitted to have sex. By examining how the ever-intensifying war on sex affects both privileged and marginalized communities, the essays collected here show why sexual liberation is indispensable to social justice and human rights.”

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Oct
31
11:10 AM11:10

Arun Venugopal - Post-Trump Politics

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Oct. 31: Arun Venugopal - Post-Trump Politics

Arun Venugopal is a reporter and the host of Micropolis, WNYC's ongoing examination of race, sexuality and identity. The series has explored such issues as the global skin-lightening market, the problems with ethnic sitcoms and the meaning of turbans. Arun is a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He has appeared on PBS Newshour, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, On the Media, and Studio 360, and has been published in The GuardianThe Wall Street Journal and Salon. His commentary on Indian-American issues has appeared in the New York Times, the New York Post and the Associated Press. He also frequently serves as an emcee and moderator of panel discussions on race, religion and identity issues.

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Oct
30
6:00 PM18:00

Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work - Book Discussion

The Center for Crime & Popular Culture @ St. Francis College presents a panel discussion about an important new book: Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work (Temple University Press, 2017).

All are invited to attend this panel discussion about sex work, a realm where sexual civil liberties are embattled.  Corey Shdaimah and Chrysanthi Leon will be our in-person guests; Katie Hail-Jares will join us by Skype from Australia.  Co-editors of, Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work, the trio will enlighten us about sex work in the 21st century as well as the larger war on sex. Copies will be available for purchase; refreshments to follow!

Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work brings the voices of lower-echelon sex workers and individuals charged with policy development and enforcement into conversation with one another. Chapters highlight some of the current approaches to sex work, such as diversion courts, trafficking task forces, law enforcement assisted diversion and decriminalization. It also examines how sex workers navigate seldom-discussed social phenomena like gentrification, pregnancy, imperialism, and being subjects of research. Through dialogue, our authors reveal the complex reality of engaging in and regulating sex work in the United States and through American aid abroad.

Katie Hail-Jares is a post-doctoral researcher at Griffith Criminology Institute in South East Queensland, and national board member of the Sex Workers' Outreach Project. Her research has appeared in PLOS-ONEJournal of Drug and Alcohol Dependency, Iowa Law Review, and other journals.

Corey S. Shdaimah is Associate Professor and Academic Coordinator of the dual degree MSW/JD program at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She is the author or co-author of several books, including Change Research: A Case Study of Collaborative Methods for Social Workers and Advocates.

Chrysanthi S. Leon is Associate Professor of Sociology & Criminal Justice, Women & Gender Studies, and Legal Studies at the University of Delaware. She is the author of Sex Fiends, Perverts, and Pedophiles: Understanding Sex Crime Policy in America.

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Oct
17
11:10 AM11:10

Marty Tankleff - Being Wrongfully Convicted & Exonerated

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

October 17: Marty Tankleff - Being Wrongfully Convicted & Exonerated

Marty Tankleff was wrongly convicted of murdering his wealthy parents when he was 17 years old after being pressured into a false confession. He served 17 years before his conviction was vacated. Tankleff received a settlement from the state after he settled his wrongful conviction lawsuit; he recently graduated from law school and passed the bar exam; Marty now plans to help the wrongfully convicted. He will be joined by his lawyer Amy Marion (Partner at Barket & Marion).

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Oct
3
11:10 AM11:10

Debbie Nathan - Politics on the U.S.-Mexican Border

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Oct. 3: Debbie Nathan - Politics on the U.S.-Mexican Border 

Debbie Nathan has been a journalist, editor and translator for almost three decades. She specializes in writing about immigration, the U.S.-Mexico border, sexual politics and sex panics, particularly in relation to women and children. Debbie is author and co-author of four books, including Sybil, Inc (2012); she currently works for the ACLU as an investigator at the U.S.-Mexican border and recently published the piece, DPS Troopers Push Undocumented Immigrants Into a Deportation Pipeline.

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Sep
26
11:10 AM11:10

Catherine Carpenter - The Unconstitutionality of Sex Offense Laws

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 26: Catherine Carpenter - The Unconstitutionality of Sex Offense Laws

Professor Catherine Carpenter (Southwestern Law School) is a nationally renowned criminal law scholar in the area of sex crimes and sex offender registration laws. Her scholarship has been cited by numerous courts and used as a guide by attorneys; she is also one of the foremost authorities on law school curricula and accreditation. Among her important law review articles is, “Against Juvenile Sex Offender Registration.”

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Sep
19
11:10 AM11:10

Adam H. Johnson - Media Bias and Inaccuracy

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 19: Adam H. Johnson - Media Bias and Inaccuracy

Adam H. Johnson writes for Fair Media Watch, the Nation, Alternet, and the Los Angeles Times (“How the media smears black victims”). He co-hosts Citations Needed, a weekly podcast about the intersection of media, PR, and power, with Nima Shirazi.

@AdamJohnsonNYC

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Sep
12
11:10 AM11:10

Chase Madar - The Criminalization of Everyday Life  

SFC Senior Lecture Series - Perspectives on American Politics & Policies
Profs. Athena Devlin & Emily Horowitz, Co-Directors

Sept. 12: Chase Madar -The Criminalization of Everyday Life  

Chase Madar is a civil rights attorney in New York and the author of The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story behind the Wikileaks Whistleblower (Verso). Madar will talk about how we're using criminal law, police, and prisons to deal with nearly ALL of our problems, and why this is counterproductive.

@ChMadar

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Apr
25
11:10 AM11:10

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Nickie Phillips on Rape Culture

-- Prof. Phillips will talk about her new book that traces ways that sexual violence is collectively processed, mediated, negotiated, and contested by exploring public reactions to high-profile incidents and rape narratives in popular culture.

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Apr
18
11:10 AM11:10

Shannen Dee Williams on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return engagement! Guest Speaker: Shannen Dee Williams (History, University of Tennessee) on the Hidden History of African-American Nuns

-- Dr. Williams is currently working on her book, “Subversive Habits: Black Nuns and the Long Struggle to Desegregate Catholic America.” She will return to SFC this spring to talk more about her groundbreaking study chronicling the epic journey of black Catholic sisters from their fiercely contested beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present day and the largely hidden history of the fight to dismantle racial and gender barriers in the U.S. Church and wider American society.

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Apr
11
11:10 AM11:10

Kay Hymowitz on Brooklyn Today

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Kay Hymowitz on her new book: Brooklyn Today -- Just decades ago, the Brooklyn stereotype was typified by television programs such as “The Honeymooners” and “Welcome Back, Kotter”—comedies about working-class sensibilities, deprivation, and struggles. Today, the borough across the East River from Manhattan is home to trendsetters, celebrities, and enough “1 percenters” to draw the Occupy Wall Street protests across the Brooklyn Bridge. “Tres Brooklyn,” has become a compliment among gourmands in Parisian restaurants. Hymowitz chronicles the policies and events that transformed the borough so dramatically and considers whether the borough’s new wealth will lift up some of the borough’s most blighted neighborhoods

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Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration
Apr
11
9:00 AM09:00

Accounting for Violence: How to Increase Safety and Reduce Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarcarceration

This forum will bring together a range of leaders in the criminal justice field to talk about strategies that can reduce both violence and mass incarceration.  The day’s dynamic conversations and interviews will be organized around four key principles outlined in a recent Common Justice report—exploring responses to violence that are centered on survivors, based in accountability, driven by safety, and racially equitable.  

 

This event is sponsored by the Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations

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Apr
4
11:10 AM11:10

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Return Engagement! Carl Dukes on his wrongful conviction -- With help from SFC criminal justice professor Don Savatta, Carl Dukes was freed from prison in July 2016. Dukes spent almost 20 years in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murdering a 23-year-old student at the University of Albany in 1997. Dukes will return to SFC to talk about his struggle to re-enter society and build his life today. Dukes was exonerated after another man confessed to killing the student.

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Mar
28
11:10 AM11:10

Katherine Parkin on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Katherine Parkin (History, Monmouth University) on Women Drivers vs. Men Drivers

This talk considers the 100+ year debate in American society about whether or not women or men are better drivers. Parkin argues that we never use the term man driver and found that people only asked the question to assert male superiority, even when the evidence discovered women as comparably good or better drivers. This talk speaks to a notion of identity and argues that we face an entrenched sexism that most people aren't aware of, including their own prejudiced views – and brings the debate up into the modern day, with dismissal of women as drivers persisting.

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Mar
21
11:10 AM11:10

Lloyd Handwerker on the history of Nathan's Hot Dogs

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Guest Speaker and Film Screening: Lloyd Handwerker, author/film-maker on the history of Nathan’s Hot Dogs (and a grandson of Nathan’s founder Nathan Handwerker).

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Mar
7
11:10 AM11:10

Emily Horowitz on Moral Panics

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Emily Horowitz will talk about her ongoing research on how moral panics inform our sex offense legal regime; she’s teaching a new course this semester on “Sex Crimes and American Justice” in the American Studies/Criminal Justice department.

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Mar
3
to Mar 5

Beyond the Bars Conference 2017: Transcending the Punishment Paradigm

The Beyond the Bars Conference, now going into its 7th year, is an annual event that brings together a trans-disciplinary group to advance the work of ending mass incarceration and mass criminalization and building a just and safe society. Each year scholars, students, activists, advocates, policy makers, government officials and those who have been most directly impacted by issues of incarceration and criminalization come together for three days to deepen our collective analysis, strengthen our network of those working for change and make visible the many ways those from the academy and the community can engage in action.

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Feb
28
11:10 AM11:10

Arnold Sparr "on Single out the Draft Boards: The Catholic Left's Campaign Against the Vietnam War"

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Historian Arnold Sparr and members of the Catholic Worker will speak on “Single out the Draft Boards: The Catholic Left's Campaign Against the Vietnam War”

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Feb
24
12:30 PM12:30

Place and Punishment in an Era of Mass Incarceration

Over the last four decades, mass imprisonment transformed the character of poverty and community life in the United States. However, few studies have examined community conditions of incarceration beyond large, metropolitan cities. In an analysis of a unique spatial dataset of prison admissions in Massachusetts (1973-2014), Prof. Jessica Simes will explore the historical trajectory of mass incarceration as it relates to local conditions of racial segregation, poverty, crime, and patterns of social control. Findings show racial disparities in incarceration vary distinctly by place—across metropolitan cities, smaller central cities, suburbs, and towns. In addition, the spatial pattern of imprisonment has changed dramatically over the course of the prison boom, pointing to isolated urban and suburban areas with extreme levels of state prison admissions and a pattern of “concentrated decarceration” in Boston. In sum, mass incarceration emerged not just to manage distinctively urban social problems but was characteristic of a broader mode of governance that could be seen in communities often far-removed from deep inner-city poverty.

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Feb
21
11:10 AM11:10

Freedom Rider and Civil Rights Leader Bernard Lafayette

  • St. Francis College, Founder's Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Freedom Rider and Civil Rights Leader Bernard Lafayette (*in Founder’s Hall)

21-year-old Bernard Lafayette hailed from Tampa, FL and was enrolled as an undergraduate at Nashville's American Baptist Theological Seminary. A veteran of the Nashville sit-ins, Lafayette had already staged a successful impromptu Freedom Ride with his close friend and fellow student activist John Lewis in 1959, while traveling home for Christmas break, when they decided to exercise their rights as interstate passengers by sitting in the front of a bus from Nashville, TN to Birmingham, AL. As part of the May 17 Nashville Student Movement Ride, Lafayette endured jail time in Birmingham, riots and firebombings in Montgomery, AL, an arrest in Jackson, MS and jail time at Parchman State Prison Farm during June 1961. After the end of the Freedom Riders campaign, he worked on voting rights and helped to coordinate the 1968 Poor Peoples Campaign. He completed a doctorate in Education at Harvard University and for several years was the Director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches at Emory University and conducts nonviolent workshops worldwide. (Bio and photo from The American Experience/PBS).

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Feb
15
to Feb 16

12th Annual Harry Frank Guggeheim Symposium on Crime in America - Justice in the Trump Era: The State of American Criminal Justice (2017 and Beyond)

As a new administration takes office in Washington, examining the challenges of the U.S. criminal justice system—and the prospects for change---has never been so critical. We’ve invited some of the nation’s leading justice professionals, academics, practitioners, and journalists to give us their first take on justice in the Trump era. Please join us on Feb 16-17! 

A registration fee of $25 will allow you entry to all sessions on either or both days (including continental breakfast).

The symposium is organized by John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice. 

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Feb
14
11:10 AM11:10

Sara Haviland on James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Sara Haviland on James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement

Prof. Haviland will talk about her recent book on the Jacksons, a married couple based in Brooklyn who worked together in the Black Freedom Movement with an emphasis on black freedom in the 1930s and 1940s.

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Feb
7
11:10 AM11:10

Ian Maloney on Breaking Boundaries in Brooklyn, New York's Bookish Borough

Join us for the Senior Citizen Lectures and Institute for Peace & Justice guest lectures and events this semester. --Co-directors, Sara Rzeszutek Haviland and Emily Horowitz

Prof. Ian Maloney (English) on “Breaking Boundaries in Brooklyn, New York’s Bookish Borough” -- Prof. Maloney teaches a course at St. Francis on “Brooklyn: Film & Fiction”.

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